Clay Assay

Post Reply
Placer Paul
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: November 9th, 2017, 1:27 am
Country of Origin: Canada

Clay Assay

Post by Placer Paul » November 9th, 2017, 2:01 am

I'm a placer gold miner in the Cariboo of BC Canada. I have a very blue clay layer that I would like to have assayed for gold, silver, platinum, and palladium.

I've had other ores assayed by labs before but I'm unclear if clay is in a different category for assaying? Do I need to ask for a specific type of assay to be done in order to get accurate results for all the precious metals?

Another sort of related question is about my back sands. I've had my black sands concentrates assayed for gold. But If I get them assayed for all the other precious metals is there also a specific assay test I should ask for with regards to the black sands for other precious metals? Seems to me there are 1000 different assay types listed in the pamphlets they gave me and I'm no geologist to figure out which test I should ask for.

If there is a particular lab you guys would recommend in Canada that comes highly recommended please advise me as such. I have used Acme and Met Solve in the past here in BC.
Or if anyone here would like to do the assays I could also do that too. Someone in Canada may be best if there are issues mailing ore over the border. But if not I'd be happy to mail samples to the USA also.
Clay8.jpg
Clay7.jpg
Clay5.jpg
BlueClay.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
kjavanb123
Active Member
Posts: 1549
Joined: April 1st, 2009, 1:20 am
Country of Origin: U.S.A
Location: U.A.E

Re: Clay Assay

Post by kjavanb123 » November 9th, 2017, 3:00 am

Looks like Azurite mineral. Nice color though.

User avatar
g_axelsson
Active Member
Posts: 4930
Joined: November 17th, 2007, 8:46 pm
Location: Sweden

Re: Clay Assay

Post by g_axelsson » November 9th, 2017, 5:08 am

That's some crazy blue clay.

If that was azurite it would contain crazy amounts of copper. My guess is more on organic residues, vivianite can form if there is a lot of phosphates in the clay.

A classical example is blue babe, https://www.alaska.edu/uajourney/histor ... enger-fro/

Göran
Visit the GoldRefiningWiki, an online refining encyclopedia.
It also contains an online version of the book "Refining Precious Metal Wastes" by Hoke.

Placer Paul
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: November 9th, 2017, 1:27 am
Country of Origin: Canada

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Placer Paul » November 9th, 2017, 11:54 am

Any advice on what kind of assay I have to ask for to check it for precious metals?

User avatar
g_axelsson
Active Member
Posts: 4930
Joined: November 17th, 2007, 8:46 pm
Location: Sweden

Re: Clay Assay

Post by g_axelsson » November 9th, 2017, 12:26 pm

Why not contact the company and explain what you want to know. They could probably tell you which one of their assays is the best for what you want to find out.

Göran
Visit the GoldRefiningWiki, an online refining encyclopedia.
It also contains an online version of the book "Refining Precious Metal Wastes" by Hoke.

User avatar
4metals
Active Member
Posts: 4422
Joined: April 5th, 2009, 8:05 pm
Country of Origin: USA
Location: northeast USA

Re: Clay Assay

Post by 4metals » November 9th, 2017, 1:28 pm

If I saw that in a populated industrial area I would be convinced someone dumped a load of hazardous waste and covered it up!

But seriously, I would send a sample to a lab with an AA and ask for 2 things. A dore fire assay to give you total precious metals, and an AA for base line gold platinum and palladium. If a sample is digested in Aqua regia it will give you semi quantitative and at worst qualitative results, and depending on those results you can furnish any specifics on the mineral types you expect in there so a proper fire assay can be performed. But to start no sense beating yourself up when it is nothing more than blue clay for now, you need qualitative results first which should be cheaper and faster at this point.
Take a trip to our Library, download a copy of Hoke's book for free and learn from previous threads which have been selected and indexed in the library so it is easier to find. Get to the library quickly from; HERE

Placer Paul
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: November 9th, 2017, 1:27 am
Country of Origin: Canada

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Placer Paul » November 9th, 2017, 7:47 pm

4metals wrote:If I saw that in a populated industrial area I would be convinced someone dumped a load of hazardous waste and covered it up!

But seriously, I would send a sample to a lab with an AA and ask for 2 things. A dore fire assay to give you total precious metals, and an AA for base line gold platinum and palladium. If a sample is digested in Aqua regia it will give you semi quantitative and at worst qualitative results, and depending on those results you can furnish any specifics on the mineral types you expect in there so a proper fire assay can be performed. But to start no sense beating yourself up when it is nothing more than blue clay for now, you need qualitative results first which should be cheaper and faster at this point.
lol ya it's a very deep bright blue. Some of the areas of the clay vein look painted it is so blue. Some of it fades to lighter blue/grey. And some of the rock in it are very blue but I'm not sure if they are stained from the clay minerals or if the rocks themselves are what is leaching their minerals into the clay.

The area is 3000 meters up in virgin ground. Never has been mined before. The roads just got cut up the mountain a couple years ago.
Thank you for the info. That's exactly what I was wondering cause I've gotten assays before only to be told afterwards by someone else that I got the wrong kind of assay. I gather not all labs are as helpful as they could be in recommending what type of test is best.

Placer Paul
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: November 9th, 2017, 1:27 am
Country of Origin: Canada

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Placer Paul » November 10th, 2017, 9:46 pm

4metals wrote:If I saw that in a populated industrial area I would be convinced someone dumped a load of hazardous waste and covered it up!

But seriously, I would send a sample to a lab with an AA and ask for 2 things. A dore fire assay to give you total precious metals, and an AA for base line gold platinum and palladium. If a sample is digested in Aqua regia it will give you semi quantitative and at worst qualitative results, and depending on those results you can furnish any specifics on the mineral types you expect in there so a proper fire assay can be performed. But to start no sense beating yourself up when it is nothing more than blue clay for now, you need qualitative results first which should be cheaper and faster at this point.
If I wanted to also get a 48 element assay would you recommend giving a separate sample in for that assay on it's own or get them to use the same sample as for the precious metals as for the other 48 element assay?
I've been told that by the looks of the clay there may also be silver and copper in it but who knows I want it in writing from a reputable lab.

Platdigger
Active Member
Posts: 1612
Joined: July 26th, 2007, 1:48 am
Location: Washington

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Platdigger » November 11th, 2017, 1:56 am

I am curious if you found cobalt.
Did you see this? http://goldrefiningforum.com/phpBB3/vie ... 44&t=10932

User avatar
4metals
Active Member
Posts: 4422
Joined: April 5th, 2009, 8:05 pm
Country of Origin: USA
Location: northeast USA

Re: Clay Assay

Post by 4metals » November 11th, 2017, 10:19 am

I agree 100% that a small chemistry set and the ability to test samples of ore in the field is invaluable. These qualitative tests are specific and easy to perform. The 48 element testing is nowhere near as valuable as what you will learn doing it in the field. And for the money you spend on the lab scan you can probably set yourself up with the little lab described in the link.

Good call Platdigger!
Take a trip to our Library, download a copy of Hoke's book for free and learn from previous threads which have been selected and indexed in the library so it is easier to find. Get to the library quickly from; HERE

snoman701
Active Member
Posts: 1518
Joined: October 8th, 2016, 10:24 pm
Country of Origin: USA
Location: SE MI

Re: Clay Assay

Post by snoman701 » November 11th, 2017, 11:42 am

Platdigger wrote:I am curious if you found cobalt.
Did you see this? http://goldrefiningforum.com/phpBB3/vie ... 44&t=10932
That is awesome!!!

Wish I had such a thing when I was in geology classes.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Placer Paul
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: November 9th, 2017, 1:27 am
Country of Origin: Canada

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Placer Paul » November 13th, 2017, 4:30 pm

Platdigger wrote:I am curious if you found cobalt.
Did you see this? http://goldrefiningforum.com/phpBB3/vie ... 44&t=10932
Wow that is some great info in that link!
4metals wrote:I agree 100% that a small chemistry set and the ability to test samples of ore in the field is invaluable. These qualitative tests are specific and easy to perform. The 48 element testing is nowhere near as valuable as what you will learn doing it in the field. And for the money you spend on the lab scan you can probably set yourself up with the little lab described in the link.
Good call Platdigger!
I wish I had the time to experiment around with this kind of thing in the field but I'm in a remote area and every second I have up there needs to be spent on running material through the trommel to advance my findings on proving up the placer gold ground. For now I'll have to rely on lab assay's for analyzing other materials.

Platdigger
Active Member
Posts: 1612
Joined: July 26th, 2007, 1:48 am
Location: Washington

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Platdigger » November 14th, 2017, 4:27 am


User avatar
g_axelsson
Active Member
Posts: 4930
Joined: November 17th, 2007, 8:46 pm
Location: Sweden

Re: Clay Assay

Post by g_axelsson » November 14th, 2017, 4:40 am

By a coincident I found an old Swedish report about a place up in the mountains where there is a 4 inch thick layer of blue dirt all across a valley, so blue that it was used in paint back at that time.
The analysis showed a layer enriched in phosphorus and iron, or in other words, the mineral vivianite.

Göran
Visit the GoldRefiningWiki, an online refining encyclopedia.
It also contains an online version of the book "Refining Precious Metal Wastes" by Hoke.

Placer Paul
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: November 9th, 2017, 1:27 am
Country of Origin: Canada

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Placer Paul » November 14th, 2017, 2:26 pm

Platdigger wrote:I have used these guys. http://www.reedlab.altervista.org/price.html#arc
Thank you Platdigger. I have decided to stay within Canada for my assay's though. Just in case there's issues with samples going across the border.
g_axelsson wrote:By a coincident I found an old Swedish report about a place up in the mountains where there is a 4 inch thick layer of blue dirt all across a valley, so blue that it was used in paint back at that time.
The analysis showed a layer enriched in phosphorus and iron, or in other words, the mineral vivianite.
Göran
Goran I've also read that people from way back in time have sought out the blue clay for artistic, religious, and healing properties. Very cool! Wow that Vivianite is a very impressive looking mineral!

Placer Paul
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: November 9th, 2017, 1:27 am
Country of Origin: Canada

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Placer Paul » October 28th, 2018, 12:57 pm

2017 mining season was horrible for us as there were forest fires all around our area and the government kicked us out of the bush leaving us very little time to do exploration.

This past 2018 season was much more productive. Got lot's of exploration done, new trails/roads built and brought home a lot of concentrates to process as well as 5 buckets of the blue clay to have assayed and to inspect further at home.
I sent some samples off for 60 element assay as well as precious metals assay and heavy metals assay.
I also dissolved some samples of the clay in water at home then panned them out and put the heavies left in the pan under microscope. Depending on the assay results I may also get a full mineralology report on the clay for further testing.
All my best gold found so far on my claims have been test samples from right above the blue clay layer. The old river channel gravel laying on the blue clay is where my best gold is. There is glacial till above the old river channel gravels which also has gold but much finer gold in those layers and much less gold/yard than what is in the river channel gravel sitting on the blue clay. Under the blue clay is very hard to dig with my 130 excavator and I dug into Schist bedrock right under the blue clay in one area of my claim and I suspect there is a wide long bedrock dyke running under the blue clay as I had a 2D Resistivity survey done years ago which showed this bedrock dyke coming up not far from where I hit the Schist dyke under the blue clay.

Some pictures from my exploration and sampling this season. Will have to post them 5 pictures at a time as I think that's all the forum allows per post.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Placer Paul
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: November 9th, 2017, 1:27 am
Country of Origin: Canada

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Placer Paul » October 28th, 2018, 1:01 pm

Some more pics from my 2018 season.

The bedrock Schist has pyrite cube inclusions in the matrix.
20180925_112135B.jpg
20180831_134734b.jpg
20180831_134747b.jpg
20180831_140128b.jpg
20180831_140200b.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Placer Paul
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: November 9th, 2017, 1:27 am
Country of Origin: Canada

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Placer Paul » October 28th, 2018, 1:05 pm

Pictures continued.
20180831_140234b.jpg
20180904_095406.jpg
20180904_100130.jpg
20180904_104015.jpg
TestPit#5Gold.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

bcgold
Active Member
Posts: 66
Joined: March 22nd, 2016, 12:06 pm
Country of Origin: Ca

Re: Clay Assay

Post by bcgold » October 28th, 2018, 5:06 pm

Placer Paul wrote:
November 10th, 2017, 9:46 pm
4metals wrote:If I saw that in a populated industrial area I would be convinced someone dumped a load of hazardous waste and covered it up!

But seriously, I would send a sample to a lab with an AA and ask for 2 things. A dore fire assay to give you total precious metals, and an AA for base line gold platinum and palladium. If a sample is digested in Aqua regia it will give you semi quantitative and at worst qualitative results, and depending on those results you can furnish any specifics on the mineral types you expect in there so a proper fire assay can be performed. But to start no sense beating yourself up when it is nothing more than blue clay for now, you need qualitative results first which should be cheaper and faster at this point.
If I wanted to also get a 48 element assay would you recommend giving a separate sample in for that assay on it's own or get them to use the same sample as for the precious metals as for the other 48 element assay?
I've been told that by the looks of the clay there may also be silver and copper in it but who knows I want it in writing from a reputable lab.
https://www.src.sk.ca/labs/geoanalytical-laboratories

Placer Paul
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: November 9th, 2017, 1:27 am
Country of Origin: Canada

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Placer Paul » October 30th, 2018, 12:06 pm

Thank you for the link but I have already sent samples in to a lab here in BC

Placer Paul
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: November 9th, 2017, 1:27 am
Country of Origin: Canada

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Placer Paul » October 12th, 2019, 3:48 pm

I was finally was able to get the blue clay assayed. Wondering if you guys can look them over and let me know if you think there's anything interesting in these results and if the clay is worth anything for refining? The deposit is very easy for me to get to with my excavators as I'm digging the gravels off above and below it anyways to process for the placer gold.
The clay comes off in nice compact chunks from 6" to 3 feet thick in areas. Lays down like a sheet. Some local geologists figure it may have been the bottom of the old glacial lake beds that formed when the glaciers moving through formed ice dams causing water ways to build up in those areas. There is almost no rock in it at all. Very fine grained. I have been stock piling it so far separate from the gravels just in case there's something I can do with it.

Also curious if you guys might be able to tell what elements in this assay might be giving it the blue color it has.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Deano
Active Member
Posts: 288
Joined: February 23rd, 2014, 7:12 pm
Country of Origin: Australia

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Deano » October 12th, 2019, 6:34 pm

Your analyses show nothing of value in the metals.

There is a strong possibility of a market in the artisan field as potting clay or as a glaze precursor.

Find some local hobbyist and get them to do a few tests for you.

If the colour is from organics then you will most likely lose it during the firing stage.

It is always worthwhile to have a sulfide containing bedrock analysed for precious metals, the easiest method is to crush some of the rock and pan off a sulfide concentrate for analysis. This way the lab can flux just for sulfides and minimise fluxing problems you get with an unknown ore sample.

Deano

Placer Paul
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: November 9th, 2017, 1:27 am
Country of Origin: Canada

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Placer Paul » October 12th, 2019, 6:37 pm

How about the Aluminum and Titanium assay values? Titanium=5156 g/ton and Aluminum = 89206 g/ton

Placer Paul
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: November 9th, 2017, 1:27 am
Country of Origin: Canada

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Placer Paul » October 12th, 2019, 8:55 pm

The blue might be coming from the minerals associated with the Titanium. This open pit Titanium mine has a very blue color in the deposit.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
g_axelsson
Active Member
Posts: 4930
Joined: November 17th, 2007, 8:46 pm
Location: Sweden

Re: Clay Assay

Post by g_axelsson » October 13th, 2019, 7:00 am

Sounds like a typical glacial clay to me. Aluminium silicates with a few trace minerals.

The color of the clay could be anything but blue is quite common among glacial clay... at least where I live. There are one mineral that could be responsible for the color and it's a phosphate, vivianite. There is some organic material in the clay (judging from the carbon content) and vivianite can form from organic residues in quite a short time. There are some phosphates in there according to the assay so that is my guess.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivianite

Göran
Visit the GoldRefiningWiki, an online refining encyclopedia.
It also contains an online version of the book "Refining Precious Metal Wastes" by Hoke.

Placer Paul
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: November 9th, 2017, 1:27 am
Country of Origin: Canada

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Placer Paul » October 13th, 2019, 1:52 pm

g_axelsson wrote:
October 13th, 2019, 7:00 am
Sounds like a typical glacial clay to me. Aluminium silicates with a few trace minerals.

The color of the clay could be anything but blue is quite common among glacial clay... at least where I live. There are one mineral that could be responsible for the color and it's a phosphate, vivianite. There is some organic material in the clay (judging from the carbon content) and vivianite can form from organic residues in quite a short time. There are some phosphates in there according to the assay so that is my guess.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivianite

Göran
Yes I think it's a glacial clay for sure. Interesting about the Vivianite. I'm going to talk to the lab guy that did the assay and ask him if he can identify the minerals responsible for the elements in the clay. But I think that may not be possible without further tests. From my readings there's two main minerals that the Titanium could be. They are Ilmenite and Rutile. A lot of the Titanium deposits around the world are sedimentary sand/clay deposits. And most of them appear to be in the same concentrations as what's in this clay.
Would you happen to have a guess as to what minerals the aluminum may be? Do you think it would be just in the Aluminum Silicate form? If that is the case do you think it would gravity separate from the Iron and Titanium metals?

I watched a good video on Titanium processing from sands and looks like they first gravity separate the metals from the silica etc then use electrostatic separator to separate the magnetic iron from the non magnetic metals. Then they use the Kroll process to create a Titanium sponge them purify it further from that.
Looks like what a lot of mines do though is just half the process of gravity separation and sell the concentrate ore to overseas countries.
I'm just looking into this a bit because for me placer mining the gold I have to process all the gravels above and below the clay layer anyway so I may as well stock pile it and then try to sell it if I can.
There are four companies in BC Canada not too far from where I'm mining that can process clay in large amounts but not too sure about getting full refining of the Kroll process done here. I will find that out on Tuesday when they open back up. If ACME can do it then that would be a real easy delivery/sell for me cause they are close and reputable to deal with. They have a sister ore refining company here. There is at least 100's of thousands of tons of the blue clay on my claim but probably much more like millions of tons cause I have hit it in my testing everywhere I have dug so far which is hectares of testing along the valley bottom near the creek.
If a company wants the clay for the metals in it then I can either truck it out in it's natural form or if it would save me a lot of money in transport costs and more money in selling a concentrate then I could semi process it right on my claim site then transport it. But would be a lot easier to just sell it in it's natural form.
Even if it's just a bit of extra income to the mine then it helps pay for stepping up to production phase of the gold mining. Just my thoughts about it so far anyways.

User avatar
g_axelsson
Active Member
Posts: 4930
Joined: November 17th, 2007, 8:46 pm
Location: Sweden

Re: Clay Assay

Post by g_axelsson » October 13th, 2019, 4:25 pm

I'm suspecting I have seen the same youtube videos you have. I think clay would be a lot harder to process to get the titanium out. The grains are too small for normal processing, just as catching very fine gold in a wash plant. The finer the material the longer it will take to separate it. This clay was deposited in a slow or stationary water over a long time, the individual grains stays suspended in water for hours or days before settling.

You can always check with the companies that process clay. They should know best and they also know about your local geology.

Just forget about the aluminium. When minerals as feldspar and other aluminium silicates weathers it breaks down into clay-minerals which still is aluminium silicates but enriched in aluminium. The next step is when clay weathers, then the silicate is washed away (millions of years) and remaining is aluminium oxide and hydroxide. That is what bauxite comes from, the most common aluminium ore.

If the phosphorus is in the form of vivianite or some other mineral is just an academic question. It would be fun to know but hardly something worth spending a couple of hundred dollars on. With a SEM (scanning electron microscope) equipped with an EDS (basically an XRF but for a SEM) you could find it out quite easily, but that's some expensive equipment... I should know as I got one. :mrgreen:
... but I haven't had the time to put it in order yet, I suspect I have some work to do on it before I can run any samples. I would be very surprised if I don't have to do some repair on the system before getting it up and running.

Göran
Visit the GoldRefiningWiki, an online refining encyclopedia.
It also contains an online version of the book "Refining Precious Metal Wastes" by Hoke.

Placer Paul
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: November 9th, 2017, 1:27 am
Country of Origin: Canada

Re: Clay Assay

Post by Placer Paul » October 13th, 2019, 5:52 pm

g_axelsson wrote:
October 13th, 2019, 4:25 pm
I'm suspecting I have seen the same youtube videos you have. I think clay would be a lot harder to process to get the titanium out. The grains are too small for normal processing, just as catching very fine gold in a wash plant. The finer the material the longer it will take to separate it. This clay was deposited in a slow or stationary water over a long time, the individual grains stays suspended in water for hours or days before settling.

You can always check with the companies that process clay. They should know best and they also know about your local geology.

Just forget about the aluminium. When minerals as feldspar and other aluminium silicates weathers it breaks down into clay-minerals which still is aluminium silicates but enriched in aluminium. The next step is when clay weathers, then the silicate is washed away (millions of years) and remaining is aluminium oxide and hydroxide. That is what bauxite comes from, the most common aluminium ore.

If the phosphorus is in the form of vivianite or some other mineral is just an academic question. It would be fun to know but hardly something worth spending a couple of hundred dollars on. With a SEM (scanning electron microscope) equipped with an EDS (basically an XRF but for a SEM) you could find it out quite easily, but that's some expensive equipment... I should know as I got one. :mrgreen:
... but I haven't had the time to put it in order yet, I suspect I have some work to do on it before I can run any samples. I would be very surprised if I don't have to do some repair on the system before getting it up and running.

Göran
This is the Youtube video I was referring to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41yjeguApo4

I have been thinking the same way that the particle sizes may be too small for gravity separation of the Titanium from the clay. So I processed 5 lbs of it the other day to extract the solids and separated them into different mesh sizes. The smallest screen I have right now is 230 mesh so I've got the clay/water slurry that is remaining in my garage in a garbage can to let the solids settle down for a week or so then I plan on screening that down further with a 400 mesh if I can find one to buy. This way I can see what mesh size the Titanium minerals are showing in more than others. I will phone both the clay processors and the Titanium processors on Tuesday to see what mesh sizes they can process. I have read though that they process a lot of sedimentary deposits of it from sands to clays. There's one in Africa I read about that said it was a sand and clay deposit of an old river channel.

So when you say forget about the aluminum, why is that? Is it too hard to refine aluminum from aluminum silicates? And it's easier to refine aluminum oxide?
Could it be that there is aluminum oxides in the clay? Is there a special assay that can tell me that without doing a full minerology report like a Qemscan? Those are pricey as I have done them on hard rock ore.

The organics in the clay are very small plant fibers like hair roots. They are very light weight and separate easily from the clay.

Glacial clay is very popular with clay cosmetics but I think the 10ppm of lead reading may not allow me to use it for that. Supposed to get a call back next week from one of the big clay cosmetic manufacturers next week about that. I've tried finding the info online about the heavy metal allowances for cosmetic clay but I can't find anything substantial about it written by the government. The clay company should be able to give me that info though.

There is a lab close to me where I live that wants to look at the material I have from both my sluice concentrates and the clay concentrates and they have an SEM. The owner has been very helpful with questions I've had in the past and invited me by next week to talk to them about this stuff. He did a free test on some Schist ore I had cause we had a lot in common about prospecting etc too and was curious what mineral was in the ore that was conductive. Turned out it was pyrrhotite crystals. I was getting detector sounds in the ore from my Falcon MD20 wand. Anyways they are super nice folks and it's a small lab so gonna go by there next week with some samples.
Very cool you have an SEM. I imagine your gonna have a lot of fun with that!
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
g_axelsson
Active Member
Posts: 4930
Joined: November 17th, 2007, 8:46 pm
Location: Sweden

Re: Clay Assay

Post by g_axelsson » October 13th, 2019, 9:23 pm

It seems you are well connected. It's a good thing to be able to float ideas to different people. You have a lot of good connections there and I hope you'll find usage for your clay. But as a metal ore I don't think you'll find any economy in it

Aluminium is the third most common element on the Earth. This is just the mean values according to Wikipedia.
Oxygen 46%, silicon 28%, aluminum 8.3%, iron 5.6%, calcium 4.2%, sodium 2.5%, magnesium 2.4%, potassium 2.0%, and titanium 0.61%. Other elements occur at less than 0.15%.

Your clay contains 28% silicon and 8.9% aluminium, just above the mean value of the crust. Any random rock you pick up have about 50% chance to have more aluminium than your clay.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abundance ... l_elements
Comparing the numbers also shows your clay to contain less titanium than a random rock in average. So I have a hard time to see any values in titanium and aluminium.

Yes, a SEM is a fun toy. I bought my at scrap price a couple of years ago and have moved it three times as I've been forced out of my rented space. I finally got fed up moving all my stuff and bought a house outside of town. So next time I move it's my own choice. When I bought it I already had a TEM that I got as scrap (1.8 tons of technology), but I decided to sell it as there were no space in the house.

I have finally started to get some order in the chaos and the first priority is to build my lab with dual fume hoods. After that I might set up the SEM, but I have more projects too... and work now and then to pay for my playtime. :mrgreen:

Göran
Visit the GoldRefiningWiki, an online refining encyclopedia.
It also contains an online version of the book "Refining Precious Metal Wastes" by Hoke.

Post Reply