My solution cristallized

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IcyTone6

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Hi. Hope someone can help me with this. I I dissolved my gold in some aqua regia and it didn't come out yellow after everything was dissolved. I think I might of missed a step somewhere . so I added some urea and heated it up thinking it would help turn it yellow for some stupid reason, and it ended crystallizing. can somebody help me out with this or is this a wash and just toss and start over.
 

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Geo

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Looks like urea nitrate. The green color is base metal. Probably copper. Too green for nickel. Test with stannous chloride for the presence of gold. Was there any solids left from dissolving the gold? Solid metal?
 

IcyTone6

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What does a stannous chloride test show?

Dave
I'm making stannous right now I will let you know ASAP
Looks like urea nitrate. The green color is base metal. Probably copper. Too green for nickel. Test with stannous chloride for the presence of gold. Was there any solids left from dissolving the gold? Solid metal?
No solids left. I'm pretty sure I know what I did wrong for next time.
I never separated the solution and gold from when I was getting rid of the copper I just add the everything together.
 

orvi

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be careful with handling supposed urea nitrate. dry powder is high explosive. relatively difficult to detonate, but all care should be taken :) trace metal contamination could sensitize some of the explosives. i do not know if this is also the case, but with stuff like this, i won´t mess around
 

VK3NHL

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Hi. Hope someone can help me with this. I I dissolved my gold in some aqua regia and it didn't come out yellow after everything was dissolved. I think I might of missed a step somewhere . so I added some urea and heated it up thinking it would help turn it yellow for some stupid reason, and it ended crystallizing. can somebody help me out with this or is this a wash and just toss and start over.
Use Urea on your garden.
Sulfamic Acid to de-nox.
Nitro Urea is explosive 🧨
 

IcyTone6

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Looks like urea nitrate. The green color is base metal. Probably copper. Too green for nickel. Test with stannous chloride for the presence of gold. Was there any solids left from dissolving the gold? Solid metal?
So it's still got the gold in it how would I get it out?
 

Geo

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Absolutely, what Dave said. Use heavy copper solids. The only metals that will cement onto copper is precious metals.
 

IcyTone6

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What did you dissolve in the first place? Are you sure there's gold in it? How did you get rid of copper? Which acids were used?
I dissolved gold pins and gold flakes that I got from fingers. And I don't think I ever got rid of the copper because I never filtered it or anything just did the nitric acid and the the HCl to make Aqua regia.
 

galenrog

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I use old copper buss bars. Having a tote full of odd sizes is helpful, allowing me to choose what is best for the situation. Suspend in solution with stainless steel wire or other material that is acid resistant.

Wire, in my experience, is not the best choice, for a variety of reasons. Pipe is good if sliced open, then flattened. Also for a variety of reasons.

Time for more coffee.
 
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Geo

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When you say heavy what do you recommend? I'll I have on hand is copper wire and maybe a small piece of copper pipe.
From my observations, cementing does not happen at the same rate in a column of solution. The sacrificial metal tends to erode closer to the top than it does at the bottom. This tells me that oxygen from the air helps the cementing process. Agitation that moves solution from top to bottom and from bottom to the top. Thin copper solids, when just placed in the solution and left, will erode at the top more than the bottom. This erodes the copper into two pieces with the bottom of the copper loose in the bottom of the container. If you have the ability to melt copper, melt the wire and pour in the longest piece you can. Copper pipe fittings are good, especially couplings. Use a side grinder or hacksaw and cut down one side. Wedge something into the cut to spread it open. When you can, spread the piece open and hammer it flat.
 
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