Smudge pot as incinerator?

voidforged

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With a little modification, would a smudge pot be able to be used for incineration? I just came across one on FB marketplace and it got me thinking.

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4metals

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I think it would burn effectively and even re-burn the smoke, but I think there will be too much velocity in the stack and all of the fines which hold values will be spread all across tbe neighborhood.
So I guess that’s a no in my book.
 

4metals

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Can they take the heat? They seem to be made for home heating systems which don’t see more than 65° C. You will be seeing 450° C for pyrolysis and 815° C for incineration afterburner temps.
 

justinhcase

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Can they take the heat? They seem to be made for home heating systems which don’t see more than 65° C. You will be seeing 450° C for pyrolysis and 815° C for incineration afterburner temps.
Could you not install further up the stack to give fumes some time for fumes to cool down a little before hitting more delicate equipment.
 

4metals

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I have seen chimney caps glow on metal chimneys over incinerators. And that’s on a roof top.
 

justinhcase

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I have seen chimney caps glow on metal chimneys over incinerators. And that’s on a roof top.
That does not sound terribly safe.
I was thinking about fume extraction from my torch station, maybe robust enough to use for my gas furnace as well if I got it right.
Quite a lot of cooler air being drawn in by a large welding fume extractor.
Doubt I would ever incinerate enough material to drive a runaway.
I have seen that happen with wood burners that was loaded with coal, melt a hole in the cast iron and set fire to the roof. Not good.
 

voidforged

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Would there any way to reduce the stack velocity? I have access to my father in laws metal/fabrication shop so I can modify the design as needed.
 

4metals

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I think the functionality of a smudge pot to do what it does requires the surface velocity to get the air to fuel mixture right for better combustion. So any modifications would limit it’s ability to burn efficiently.
 

justinhcase

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I think the functionality of a smudge pot to do what it does requires the surface velocity to get the air to fuel mixture right for better combustion. So any modifications would limit it’s ability to burn efficiently.
Is it not quite obvious that a device that uses high rates of convection to bring more O2 into a combustion chamber would act more like a molecular sprinkler than a controlled method of pyrolysis.
It would be able to heat a good vessel, though.
 

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