Why Red Aqua Regia ??

spoke27

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 22, 2008
Messages
117
Location
Turkey
Hii My aqua regia colour Red and why can be red ?
And I can be understanding metal type from aqua regia colour?
 

Attachments

  • DSC00043.JPG
    DSC00043.JPG
    2.7 MB · Views: 1,018

Harold_V

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2007
Messages
8,369
If you have dissolved ore, while you have a slight chance of having gold, it's highly likely you have iron in solution.

Hoke discusses a test for iron, but you should be using stannous chloride in any case. No one should process without having the means to determine if their solution has value, or not. Learn to test---it is just as important as knowing how to refine.

Note that if the solution shown is very high in unused acid, a test with stannous chloride may not be reliable.

Harold
 

spoke27

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 22, 2008
Messages
117
Location
Turkey
this test only for give me idea abouth minerals...
I am miner and living Turkey here is test very expensive.. this mineral Shape smilar Pt .Pd group And I try it and first time I see Red Aqua regia..
I want know Aqua regia colur wgat is mean ? red yellow .. or everythink But I dont found any document abouth aqua regia color merans ..
iron make red acid ?
 

Harold_V

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2007
Messages
8,369
Lou said:
Looks like platinum.
It does, but I'm having more than a little trouble with the idea that anyone can extract enough from ore to provide the bold display he has shown, thus my suggestion that it's iron.
It would be interesting to hear what stannous displays.

Harold
 

butcher

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jan 6, 2008
Messages
9,905
Location
Pacific NW
Could be red cool aid, a lot of things can color acids, I do not trust colors of solutions as indicator as to what is dissolved, unless I am pretty sure what metal I have added, colors can be clues, but without testing your guess is as good as mine? Ore can give many colors, I agree with Harold testing with stannous or assay would give better indication, and unless there were no other metals in this Ore, or you have leached them prior to dissolving this red solution, I cannot see the rich red color coming from such a hard to dissolve noble metal as platinum, in such a pure looking state, with so many metals higher in series to dissolve first, it is a beautiful color, and the color may excite me, but I would not get high hopes without further testing. But I sure hope this proves to be a noble metal. Keep us updated with this mystery
 

Oz

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 19, 2008
Messages
2,440
Location
USA
I understand Harold's hesitation but I have made some very concentrated gold and platinum solutions that look like that. The word ore makes everyone cautious as there are many mixes of elements that could combine to give that color. The thing that caught my eye is the “sticky” type residue on the sides of the beaker. Highly concentrated gold and platinum do that to me every time, they are very viscous.
 

Harold_V

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2007
Messages
8,369
Butcher's comments are sound logic. The idea that an ore sample would yield the volume of precious metal required to yield such a powerful display isn't likely. I expect that platinum is not commonly found in abundance, so the sample would have to represent a huge amount of ore. Perhaps it does. Nothing has been mentioned in that regard.

While I am not a geologist, I am of the opinion that base metals (such as nickel) would accompany such a deposit, so unless they have been addressed, I can imagine iron contributing greatly to the color. Otherwise it wouldn't be in the red/orange zone, but more in the green zone.

I hope I can be proven wrong. I still say it's iron.

Harold
 

Oz

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 19, 2008
Messages
2,440
Location
USA
To be clear, my comments as to color and viscosity are based on known metals in solution. I seldom mess with ores (other than free milling gold) for all of the above reasons. Without having greater details as to the origin and concentration methods used it is a complete guess as to what it contains, the variations are near endless with ores.
 

spoke27

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 22, 2008
Messages
117
Location
Turkey
Harold_V said:
Butcher's comments are sound logic. The idea that an ore sample would yield the volume of precious metal required to yield such a powerful display isn't likely. I expect that platinum is not commonly found in abundance, so the sample would have to represent a huge amount of ore. Perhaps it is. Nothing has been mentioned in that regard.

While I am not a geologist, I am of the opinion that base metals (such as nickel) would accompany such a deposit, so unless they have been addressed, I can imagine iron contributing greatly to the color. Otherwise it wouldn't be in the red/orange zone, but more in the green zone.

I hope I can be proven wrong. I still say it's iron.

Harold
they are not magnetic but I know some iron minerals also not magnetic.
plus I send minerals picture And I also try to refine ı will look but if anyone intrest look I can send him simple.. Ty
And I try to solve with only nitric they dont afect but when I add Hcl then they are reaction and give me that colour.. And Dont say any time imposiple cuz natura very very much mistry. I belive that
 

Attachments

  • DSC00058.JPG
    DSC00058.JPG
    2.3 MB · Views: 900

lazersteve

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Feb 27, 2007
Messages
7,052
Location
Florida
The color looks to be what I would see in dilute platinum solutions, concentrated iron solutions tend to be more orange yellow, and concentrated gold solutions that lean towards the red end of the spectrum are usually not so transparent (I can see the newspaper through his solution). When I dissolve 10-15 grams of Pt in 200 mL of AR I get a very dark blood red (think burgundy color) almost brown color that can not be seen through without a very strong light held directly up to the beaker.

Here's a snapshot of 18 grams of 95% Pt dissolved in a few hundred milliliters of AR:

pt_18g_sol.jpg


My guess, and it's just a guess, is that it is a dilute mix of several metals. Stannous and DMG tests can narrow the field of metals quickly.

Platinum would require some heating to get into the solution with AR. Platinum in ore is also found with it's sister metals and these tend to make the platinum very hard/slow to dissolve. I would be curious to hear how much heat was applied and for how long to get the color seen.

Steve
 

spoke27

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 22, 2008
Messages
117
Location
Turkey
lazersteve said:
The color looks to be what I would see in dilute platinum solutions, concentrated iron solutions tend to be more orange yellow, and concentrated gold solutions that lean towards the red end of the spectrum are usually not so transparent (I can see the newspaper through his solution). When I dissolve 10-15 grams of Pt in 200 mL of AR I get a very dark blood red (think burgundy color) almost brown color that can not be seen through without a very strong light held directly up to the beaker.

Here's a snapshot of 18 grams of 95% Pt dissolved in a few hundred milliliters of AR:

pt_18g_sol.jpg


My guess, and it's just a guess, is that it is a dilute mix of several metals. Stannous and DMG tests can narrow the field of metals quickly.

Platinum would require some heating to get into the solution with AR. Platinum in ore is also found with it's sister metals and these tend to make the platinum very hard/slow to dissolve. I would be curious to hear how much heat was applied and for how long to get the color seen.

Steve
I Dont heat but it is wait 3 4 day for done.. today I add some and colur going more dark.. we will look.. And I will say everyone here
 

Harold_V

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2007
Messages
8,369
An interesting topic, for sure. I'm really interested in the results of further tests.

That brings to mind an experience I had early on in my refining days. A fellow that scrapped electronic things had clipped a bunch of contacts, and had dissolved a few. The solution he provided was palladium, but it had a distinct red color. In all my years of refining, I never managed to reproduce that very color, and am at a loss to this day to explain why it was the color it was. The best description that comes to mind is that of the color of mercurochrome, only a slightly more pink color.

Harold
 

spoke27

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 22, 2008
Messages
117
Location
Turkey
this test result give me one idea İf this Not nobel metal then I can be use it for make red color Glass.. I know red colur galass making with Gold.. And soo rare.. BUt I will show everyone What is this minerals..
 

Attachments

  • DSC00059.JPG
    DSC00059.JPG
    2.7 MB · Views: 855

Oz

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 19, 2008
Messages
2,440
Location
USA
I hate to kill your hopes but I have spent considerable time in Venice talking to the master glassblowers about the metals they used in their craft. The red glass is expensive because they cannot find a suitable replacement for the gold. I have had this confirmed by glassblowers in Tennessee as well as Texas. If you know something they do not, let me know, and I would give you credit for it as well as a commission.
 

qst42know

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 16, 2008
Messages
2,963
Location
Toledo, Ohio, USA
You may have found some cobalt ore.

http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://en.wikivisual.com/images/8/80/Cobalt_OreUSGOV.jpg&imgrefurl=http://en.wikivisual.com/index.php/Cobalt&usg=__3XjBOKnrfv3sk3RXMUENmN3aqrM=&h=450&w=600&sz=80&hl=en&start=22&zoom=1&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=2c06MxDmPL_OpM:&tbnh=101&tbnw=135&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dcobalt%2Bore%26start%3D20%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26rlz%3D1T4ADBF_enUS241US242%26ndsp%3D20%26tbs%3Disch:1

Cobalt chloride is deep red.

http://www.hengsource.com/showproducts.asp?id=66

Cobalt nitrate is also quite red.

http://www.hengsource.com/showproducts.asp?id=68


Is there a quick test for cobalt?

I thought the color range of cobalt salts was interesting.

http://www.hengsource.com/products.asp?ClassID=36
 

spoke27

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 22, 2008
Messages
117
Location
Turkey
qst42know said:
You may have found some cobalt ore.

http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://en.wikivisual.com/images/8/80/Cobalt_OreUSGOV.jpg&imgrefurl=http://en.wikivisual.com/index.php/Cobalt&usg=__3XjBOKnrfv3sk3RXMUENmN3aqrM=&h=450&w=600&sz=80&hl=en&start=22&zoom=1&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=2c06MxDmPL_OpM:&tbnh=101&tbnw=135&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dcobalt%2Bore%26start%3D20%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26rlz%3D1T4ADBF_enUS241US242%26ndsp%3D20%26tbs%3Disch:1

Cobalt chloride is deep red.

http://www.hengsource.com/showproducts.asp?id=66

Cobalt nitrate is also quite red.

http://www.hengsource.com/showproducts.asp?id=68


Is there a quick test for cobalt?

I thought the color range of cobalt salts was interesting.

http://www.hengsource.com/products.asp?ClassID=36


no this have one mineral form And it similar same as Platinum and pyrite
BUt
you are missed one cobalt reaction with nitric this metal only reaction in aqua regie But I am know this one mineral...
 
Top